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Rockland Room

Black Sheep in the Family

Genealogy for Librarians is an email I subscribe to and lately there was discussion about "black sheep" in family research. EVERYONE has at least one in their family history. Yet, I have found thatpeople seem to think it reflects on them today. I know one person who upon finding her relative was unwed with children, was so devastated she dropped her research.

One researcher pointed out blacksheepancestors.com as a source for records in U.S., Canada and Great Britain. Check it out! There is International Black Sheep Society of Genealogists that has a web site, blacksheep.rootsweb.com

In past centuries, there were various factors that caused people to be reported in asylums. For one, mental hospitals were the only one in certain areas and served all regular hospital functions, including  births, appendectomies and broken bones.People with behaviorial problems due to head injury, illness,"hardening of the arteries", senility etc were often admitted to residential institutions.

1940 Census Has Arrived

After 10 long years, the 1940 federal census was released online in early April. For all those who need to find lost relatives and document findings, here is a chance to begin searching. By law, the federal census is withheld for 72 years so all who want to view the 1950 records will have to wait  another 10 years.

The Genealogy Society of Rockland will be meeting Tuesday, April 24 at 7 PM. At this meeting, members will be viewing the new census and making comments and observations. Should you have questions, plan to attend. Interested persons are always welcomed.

New Genealogy How-To Book

I recently saw a recommendation about a book from a fellow genealogy librarian. It was a book about the basics of genealogy.  I usually ignore these basic books as the market is flooded with so many. The Rockland Room maintains many and the standards are updated with new editions. However, I ordered this one and it looks pretty good! The tile is, How To Do Everyting Genealogy written by George W. Morgan. It is the second edition.

It covers all the basics needed for a beginner. What I think makes it different from others is that it offers a clear and simple layout. So often these basic books are filled with too much information, charts and maps. The author who has been doing research for more than 40 years, has written 432 pages on the subject. People starting out in genealogy often become discouraged because the lecture or the book are too long and detailed.

When you are in the Rockland Room, check out this book on the new book shelf. You will find the book listed as 929.1 MOR.

 

 

 

 

 

 

NYC Vital Records

Many people come into the Rockland Room looking for NYC vital records of loved ones. I want to take a minute to explain why the request is not possible. All New York City records are in the city and all the rest of the state's vital records are in Albany.

To help you understand, there are three important sites to memorize.

1). NY City Muncipal Archives, located at 31 Chambers St, holds public records for birth, deaths and marriages. Birth records are public through 1909, deaths are public through 1948 and there is a 50 year restriction on marriages after the event happened. Apparently the archives will soon become part of the Dept. of Citywide Services.

2). City Clerk's Office holds the marriage licenses beginning 1930 to present. It is located at 141 Worth St.

3. NY City Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene holds non-public birth(after 1909) and death certificates (after 1948). This agency is located at 125 Worth St.

Postal History

I was reading an article in the Spring edition of the New York Researcher. It talked about philatelic genealogy. This is one research tool that I never gave much thought. Those old postcards and posted envelopes can contain information about locations in relation to military service, work, recreation, and even political interests.

There is a web site, Philgen.org, that offers an archive of envelope and postcard images with genealogical value. Its purpose is to provide postal history available to genealogists by identifying senders and recipients. The images are posted by postcard collectors and may provide important clues for genealogists. Currently there are 1,325  envelopes and postcards and in addition to the image, there is accompanying genealogical information such as U.S. census information or similiar data.

A goal of this site is to eventually to post 20,000 envelopes and postcard photos concerning New York residents. All the images are from postal history vendor web sites and archived philatelic auction catalogs. Take a look!

Genealogy Gems

The New State Archives recently announced the creation of two tools, called pathfinders, to help genealogists and researchers locate naturalization and probate records created throughout New York. from the colonial period ro the present.

The time line for the naturalization abstracts  begins in 1664 and included is a description about a book, "Denizations, Naturalizatons and oaths of allegiance in colonial New York" by Kenneth Scott and Kynn Stryker-Rodda. A copy of this may be found in the Rockland Room.

Probate pathfinder descriptions begin prior to 1787.

To view this web site, go to www.archives.nysed.gov?a/research/res_tools_pathfinders.shtml OR if you go to

www.archives.nysed you will be directed to research and then to the pathfinders link.

 

 

 

 

 

Ancestry.com

Researchers for one week, April 7 through the 14th, Ancestry is offering free searching on the Civil War site. There are millions of records including pension records, muster rolls, New York town clerks' registrations and much more. Take advantage of this special offer.

Parenting Series: Nursing Knowledge

During the month of April, there will be a series of Monday morning programs concerning breastfeeding issues for new parents and expectant mothers. All aspects of the process will be reviewed along with secondary concerns such as returning to work and storage guidelines. Qualified counselors and personnel wiil be available at the sessions. Meet and discuss your concerns with other mothers and get your questions answered. Each session begins at 10 AM and ends at 11:30 AM.

Newspaper Choices

There is increased interest in researching old newspapers as they become digitized.This eliminates those blackened fingers, crumbly pages and musty smellsl! The time saved by keyword searching has also enhanced researchers' finding.

At the February meeting of the Genealogy Society of Rockland, two members discussed digital newspaper web sites that were very helpful to them. The first is offered by the Northern New York Historical Newspapers and the address is nnyln.net. Through this you can look at many of the newspapers in north western and central New York. The articles appear and you can reduce the full page to the article. The member speaking mentioned that he was looking for information on a relative and could never find anything about her. Voila!! He found a bunch of social notes that described tea and other social meetings at her house.

Newspaper Choices

There is increased interest in researching old newspapers as they become digitized.This eliminates those blackened fingers, crumbly pages and musty smellsl! The time saved by keyword searching has also enhanced researchers' finding.

At the February meeting of the Genealogy Society of Rockland, two members discussed digital newspaper web sites that were very helpful to them. The first is offered by the Northern New York Historical Newspapers and the address is nnyln.net. Through this you can look at many of the newspapers in north western and central New York. The articles appear and you can reduce the full page to the article. The member speaking mentioned that he was looking for information on a relative and could never find anything about her. Voila!! He found a bunch of social notes that described tea and other social meetings at her house.

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