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Mystery Monday

from the Agatha Christie plaque at Torre Abbey, TorquayAgatha Christie would have turned 120 years old last week.  Born September 15, 1890,the daughter of an American father and a British mother, Agatha  Christie is the best known mystery writer of all time.  Few would argue that the books were  literary masterpieces with their pedestrian writing and stock characters, yet people continue to read and enjoy them. Only Shakespeare and the Bible have bested her more than 2 billion copies sold.  But what explains the popularity of Christie's work and the diversity of her readers? Why do her books still sell about 25 million copies a year?

New City Champions --- Battle of the Books

In a contest between 10 libraries, our teens came in second place in The Battle of the Books at the beautiful new Warwick Library on Sunday, September 12.

THOUGHT POLICE

America's freedoms-- of speech and religion, particularly-- have been very much in the news lately.  At the end of September, libraries across the country will be putting a spotlight on the First Amendment by observing Banned Books Week.  In light of this month's events, I thought this would be a perfect time to look at the subject of censorship in speculative fiction.

Needles At Rest

With the summer months soon to become memories, volunteer members of Warm Up America have stashed crochet hooks and knitting needles away until next summer. The thirty-one completed lap robes are on display in the Meeting Room until September 9. Take a look at the varied and colorful pieces. All lap robes will be distributed to area hospitals, students with special needs and Project Linus. And, thanks to all who supported the project.

What's Cooking?: Papers, and Pencils, and Books! Oh, My!

It’s school time again!  Summer is still reluctant to let go of its lingering heat.  Nevertheless, it signals the advent of autumn with its brisk air driving the warmth away.  I love the fall season as parents get their kids ready for school and summer fun is winding down.  With the pressure of getting it altogether, there is no better time than now to find ways to put those meals on the table amidst the back-to-school pandemonium.

Budget Blues

December may seem far away, but here at the library we have been working hard on our budget for 2012. This is the budget that we will put forth to the voters in December and what will go into effect July 1, 2012. It raises the question of what do you, our customers, want. In holding the line last year we made significant savings in our operational expenses. Insurance was rebid saving $6,000. Energy expenses were cut by tens of thousands. At the same time we attempted to maintain our materials and programming budgets to provide you with the best and latest. In the current year we have no money for furniture, minimal money for building repairs and only $1,000 for computers and software. If a computer monitor breaks…there goes 20% of the computer budget. Do you want us to patch our infrastructure or replace carpets and such when they begin to fall apart? At what point to do we make major reductions in new books and DVDs purchase? What is an acceptable percentage increase that the voters will approve? Let us start a dialogue by clicking on the comment button below.

HIGHLAND GAMES

Do you dream of the misty Highlands of Scotland?  Is tartan a turn-on?  Do you long for a hero who's earthy, untamed, and perhaps a wee bit stubborn?  Have you ever wondered if it's true what Scots don't wear beneath their kilts?*  If your answer to any of these questions is "yes," it's time to prep your armchair for a literary visit to Scotland!

Why Scotland in August?  The Cowal Highland Gathering, known worldwide as the largest, grandest Highland Games in the world, kicks off today.  I suppose you could cook yourself a nice haggis or try your hand at caber tossing to commemorate the event (though for your own safety, don't try either of these at home), but for me, this is the perfect opportunity to talk about Scottish romances.

The World Will Be Saved by Steam! (Steampunk, That Is)

Symphony in mahogany, brass and polished steelLast month I surveyed predictive fiction from the past.  This month, we're turning that concept upside-down with a look at contemporary SF set in a past that never quite was: the genre-bending category known as "steampunk."  Steampunk (the word is modelled after "cyberpunk") got its start in the 1980s, but its roots lie firmly in the Victorian era, harkening back to the scientific fiction and world-spanning adventure novels of the likes of Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and H. Rider Haggard (of Allan Quatermain fame). 

What's Cooking?: The Versatile Dumpling

One of my favorite things to eat all year round is dumplings.  Not the cooked balls of dough made from flour, potato, or matzo meal (I love those too) but the ones that are filled with luscious bits of meat, shrimp, vegetables, and cheese.  There are so many kinds of dumplings made from various regions of the world.  It is a global fare that includes the samosa and karchori from India, Korean mandu, Japanese fried gyoza, Chinese wonton and potsticker, the Russian piroshki, Ukrainian vareniki, Poland’s pierogi, Turkish manti, and kreplach from the Eastern European Jews.  Let’s not forget our favorite, ravioli !

THE SMALLEST BOOKSTORE

Did you miss it?  Our 'for sale' books have new digs.  The 'Smallest Bookstore' is located in the entrance vestibule where the telephone used to be.  Pocketbooks (25 cents) are always convenient when vacationing especially if you fly.  Adult hardcover books are $1.00, children's just 50 cents. Staff restocks the shelves daily, so stop by, peruse the titles and see if you find something to add to your collection.  The Circulation staff will help with any questions.

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