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New Fiction Audiobooks for February

BCD Barry
     Lunatics
by Dave Barry and Alan Zweibel.  Read by the authors with Mark Thompson, Sean Kenin and Orlagh Cassidy.  6 discs.  6+ hours.     “Phillip Horkman is a by-the-rules kind of guy, a pet-store owner and soccer referee. Jeffrey Peckerman is a profane forensic plumber…. The New Jersey suburban dads collide when Horkman disqualifies what would have been a game-winning score made by Peckerman's daughter. The two embark on escalating violence that takes them on a wild car chase that gets viewed as a possible terrorist threat by the police.”
     Booklist 12/15/11

BCD Bond   
     Shock of War
by Larry Bond and Jim DeFelice.  10 discs.  11+ hours.

BCD Bradford
     Breaking the Rules
by Barbara Taylor Bradford.  Read by Katherine Kellgren.  11 discs.  13 hours.

BCD Clare
    Clockwork Prince
by Cassandra Clare.  Read by Ed Westwick and Heather Lind.  13 discs.  15+ hours.

BCD Coulter
     Prince of Ravenscar
by Catherine Coulter.  Read by Anne Flosnik.  9 discs.  11+ hours.

BCD Crais
     Taken
by Robert Crais.  Read by Luke Daniels.  7 discs.  7+ hours.

BCD Science Fiction Dayton
     Resurrection
by Arwen Elys Dayton.  11 discs.  12+ hours.

BCD Higgins
      A Devil is Waiting
by Jack Higgins.  Read by Michael Page.  7 discs. 7+ hours.
     “Combine the lively and always engaging characters with another timely and plausible story, and you have another Higgins hit.”
     Booklist 11/15/11

BCD Johnson
     The Orphan Master’s Son
by Adam Johnson.  Read by Tim Kang with Josiah Lee and James Kyson Lee.  15 discs.  19+ hours.     “Johnson’s novel accomplishes the seemingly impossible: an American writer has masterfully rendered the mysterious world of North Korea with the soul and savvy of a native, from its orphanages and its fishing boats to the kitchens of its high-ranking commanders.”
     Publishers Weekly 11/24/11

BCD Khoury
     The Devil’s Elixer
by Raymond Khoury.  Read by Richard Ferrone.  10 discs.  12 hours.
     “Lust for a potent, mind-ripping drug brings only trouble and dead bodies in this fast-paced thriller set primarily in Mexico and Southern California.  Vivd, energetic scenes ensure that Khoury’s tale never falters or bores.  It’s the sort of novel that could make a colorful movie, but meanwhile, enjoy the book.”
     Kirkus 12/1/11

BCD Lescroart
      The Hunter
by John T. Lescroart.  Read by Eric Dawe.  10 discs.  11+ hours.
     “How did your mother die?” For San Francisco PI Wyatt Hunt, that enigmatic text message triggers his biggest, and most personal, case—and it’s a great start to bestseller Lescroart’s outstanding fourth Hunt novel …This book succeeds on every level—as a mystery, as a thriller, and as an exploration of its appealing hero: agent: Barney Karpfinger.”
     Publishers Weekly 11/21/11

BCD Nesbo
     The Leopard
by Jo Nesbo.  Read by Robin Sachs.  17 discs.  21+ hours.

BCD Parker
     The Jaguar
by T. Jefferson Parker.  Read by David Colacci.  10 discs.  12+ hours.

BCD Scott
     The Thirteen Hallows
by Michael Scott and Colette Freedman.  Read by Kate Reading.  9 discs.  11+ hours.
     “Scott (The Alchemyst) and Freedman blend magic, folklore, mystery, and history in this zippy fantastical thriller. Relentless pacing and a richly detailed story line replete with historical references and bombshell revelations give this fantasy tremendous mainstream crossover potential.”
     Publisher Weekly 10/3/11

BCD Stevens
     The Innocen
t by Taylor Stevens.  Read by Hillary Huber.  10 discs. 
12+ hours.     “Blade-wielding heroine Vanessa Michael Munroe…is utterly driven and a little deranged, a fearsome force for both evil and good.”
     Booklist 11/1/11

BCD Taylor
     Daughter of Smoke and Bone
by Laini Taylor.  Read by Khristine Hvam.  10 discs.  12+ hours.
     “The author crafts a fierce heroine with bright-blue hair, tattoos, martial skills, a growing attachment to a preternaturally hunky but not entirely sane warrior and, in episodes to come, an army of killer angels to confront. Rarely—perhaps not since the author's own Faeries of Dreamdark: Blackbringer (2007)—does a series kick off so deliciously.”
    Kirkus 11/15/11

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