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New DVDs for October, 2010

THREE DAY DVDS

Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940 – Raymond Massey)                           #12563

Black Orpheus (1959 – Foreign – Portuguese)                              #12516

Bruriah (Foreign Film – Israel)                                                      #12604

New Large Print for October 2010

FICTION:
A Stranger in the Family by Robert Barnard

Overton Window by Glenn Beck

The Stormchasers by Jenna Blum

My Name is Memory by Ann Brashares

Tough Customer by Sandra Brown

The Glass Rainbow by James Lee Burke

The Weed that Strings the Hangman's Bag by Alan Bradley

Cure by Robin Cook

A Secret Kept by Tatiana de Rosnay

The Bride Collector by Ted Dekker

Live to Tell by Lisa Gardner

Stay a Little Longer by Dorothy Garlock

Ice Cold by Teri Gerritsen

Ghost Moon by Heather Graham

Ape House by Sara Gruen

Reckless by Andrew Gross

The Dead Lie Down by Sophie Hannah

Indivisible by Kristen Heitzmann

Star Island by Carl Hiaasen

Running Scared by Lisa Jackson

Fiction October 2010

CD Anglada
     The Violin of Auschwitz
by Maria Angels Anglada: translated from the Catalan by Martha Tennent.  Read by David Colacci.  3 discs.  3 hours.

BCD Science Fiction Bova
     The Return
by Ben Bova.  Read by Stefan Rudnicki.  10 discs.  11+ hours.

BCD Brewer
     Ninth Grade Slays
by Heather Brewer.   Read by Kevin Pariseau.  6 discs.  7+ hours.

BCD Cook
     Cure
by Robin Cook.  Read by George Guidall.  9 discs.  11+ hours.

BCD Cussler
    Lost Empire
by Clive Cussler and Grant Blackwood.  Read by Scott Brick.  10 discs.  11+ hours.

BCD  Rosnay
     A Secret Kept
by Tatiana de Rosnay.  Read by Simon Vance.  7 discs.  9 hours.

BCD Dickey
     Tempted
by Trouble by Eric Jerome Dickey.  Read by Dion Graham.  8 discs.  10 hours.

New Mysteries October 2010

Impartial Witness by Charles Todd
Back Spin by Harlan Coben
Shooting in the Shop by Simon Brett
Shadows in the Street by Susan Hill
Wicked Witch Murder by Leslie Meier
Fever of the Bone by Val McDermid
For Richer For Danger by Lisa Bork
Devil by Ken Bruen
Vermilion Drift by William Kent Krueger
Danse Macabre by Gerald Elias
Loco Motive by Mary Daheim
Deadly Daggers by Joyce Lavene
Deadly Row by Casey Mayes
Black Lizard Big Book of Black Mask Stories edited by Otto Penzler
Buzz Off by Hannah Reed
Bryant and May Off the Rails by Christopher Fowler
To Fetch a Thief by Spencer Quinn
Shadow Woman by Ake Edwardson
Hypothermia by Arnaldur Indridason
Liar, Liar by K.J. Larsen
Bleed a River Deep by Brian McGilloway

It's a Wrap!

In use since March, our remodeled Circulation Department still surprises many customers who use the library infrequently.  Now reserved material pick-up is self-service.  Items are wrapped for privacy and requests are shelved alphabetically by your last name.  We include the first three letters of your first name to differentiate those with the same last name.  There isn’t room to print your full first name and we won’t use any personal information relating to your account number.  You’ll quickly become familiar with the general area where your books are located.  Take it to one of our express self checkouts for fast service.  We are so pleased that many of you use the machines which then make it possible for staff to complete other circulation tasks or resolve customer concerns.

The self checkout might direct you to the Circulation Desk if you have overdue material, if your card needs to be updated (a yearly event), if fees are above allowed thresholds or if the hold is not in your name.   For questions about your account please speak to a staff member.

New DVD Releases for September 28th

We have five new releases for Tuesday September 28th.  They are:

Babies (Documentary)

Bruriah (Foreign Film - Israel)

Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky (Foreign Film -French)

Get Him To the Greek

Iron man 2

I'M WITH THE BANNED

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie.  Ellen Hopkins, author of Crank.  (Yes, the author, not her book.)  Slaughterhouse Five, by Kurt Vonnegut.  Twenty Boy Summer, by Sarah Ockler.  Speak, by Laurie Halse Anderson.  What do all of these have in common?  All were deemed objectionable, or unsuitable, or downright offensive.  All were challenged in a library or school in the United States in 2010-- all, in fact, within the past month.  Today kicks off Banned Books Week, when libraries nationwide will be focusing on the importance of our First Amendment rights.  In light of current events, could there be a better time to talk about the freedom to read?

BURNING BOOKS

Got your attention, didn't I?  No, I'm not advocating the destruction of library property-- quite the opposite.  Banned Books Week begins this Saturday, a time when libraries nationwide will be focusing on the importance of our First Amendment rights.  I know, it seems a little strange to think about romances and the First Amendment in the same sentence.  The more Puritan-minded of our Founding Fathers probably didn't even dream of authors like Laurell K. Hamilton, Bertrice Small, or Lora Leigh when they protected our freedom to read.  Even so, fans of steamy romances should spare a moment this week to thank those sober gentlemen.  They found it necessary to a free society to protect all speech-- even the speech they disagreed with, even the speech they personally found frivolous, or immoral, or offensive.  To celebrate, I'm going to talk about books that some would consider to be all three: really HOT romances! 

New DVD Releases for September 21st

We have three new releases for Tuesday, September 21st.  They are:

Experiment, The (Adrien Brody)

Robin Hood (Russell Crowe)

Secret In Their Eyes, The (Foreign Film - Spanish)

Mystery Monday

from the Agatha Christie plaque at Torre Abbey, TorquayAgatha Christie would have turned 120 years old last week.  Born September 15, 1890,the daughter of an American father and a British mother, Agatha  Christie is the best known mystery writer of all time.  Few would argue that the books were  literary masterpieces with their pedestrian writing and stock characters, yet people continue to read and enjoy them. Only Shakespeare and the Bible have bested her more than 2 billion copies sold.  But what explains the popularity of Christie's work and the diversity of her readers? Why do her books still sell about 25 million copies a year?

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