........

.                               Return to home page

Blogs

New Speculative Fiction for November 2009

New to our shelves:

The Stoneholding by James Anderson and Marc Sebanc (1, Legacy of the Stone Harp) F
The Mammoth Book of Mindblowing SF by Mike Ashley, ed.  (shelved at SF Mammoth) SF
The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi SF
Transition by Iain M. Banks SF, A, M
Snakeskin Road by James Braziel (2, Birmingham, 35 Miles) SF, A
The Child Thief by Brom F, H
Fire by Kristin Cashore F
Always Forever by Mark Chadbourn (3, Age of Misrule) F
Vengeance Child by Simon Clark H
And Another Thing… by Eoin Colfer & Douglas Adams (Part 6 of 3, Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) SF

New DVD Releases For November 17th

We have four new DVD releases for Tuesday, November 17th. They are:

Bruno

Is Anybody There (Michael Caine)

My Sister's Keeper (Cameron Diaz)

Star Trek

New CD-ROM Games for Fall 2009

Math Success Deluxe 2009

Bionic Commando

Wolfenstein

Batman Arkham Asylum

Need for Speed Shift

The Price is Right 2010 Edition

New PS2 Games for Fall 2009

Guitar Hero 5

Ultimate Alliance 2

NHL 2K19

NBA 2K10

Star Wars The Clone Wars: Republic Heroes

FIFA Soccer 10

New Wii Games for Fall 2009

The Beatles Rock Band

Ultimate Alliance 5

Guitar Hero 5

The Price is Right

NHL 2k10

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs

Family Fun Football

Dirt 2

Star Wars The Clone Wars: Republic Heroes

Toy Story Mania

Mario and Sonic Olympic Winter Games Vancouver 2010

FIFA Soccer 10

Family Game Night 2

Backyard Football 10

Rabbids Go Home

SimAnimals Africa

Lego Rock Band

New XBox 360 Games for Fall 2009

NBA Live 09

Guitar Hero 5

Ultimate Alliance 2

The Beatles Rockband

Need for Speed Shift

Halo 3 HDST

NHL 2k10

Dirt 2

Raiden IV

Star Wars: The Clone Wars Republic Heroes

FIFA Soccer 10

Mini Ninjas

Brual Legend

Tekken 6

Sforza Motorsport 3

Lips Number One Hits

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2

PES Pro Evolution Soccer 2010

Lego Rockland

Borderlands

New PS3 Games for Fall 2009

Guitar Hero 5

The Beatles Rockband

NHL 2K10

Katamari forever

Need for Speed Shift

NBA Live 10

Star Wars the Clone Wars: Republic Heroes

Dirt 2

NBA 2k10

Mini Ninjas

FIFA Soccer 10

Brutal Legend

Tekken 6

Borderlands

Dragon Age Origins

Call of Duty 3: Modern Warfare 2

PES 2010 Pro Evolution Soccer

WEB SITE OF THE MONTH

Take a look at this informative web site created by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. You are able to locate a veteran's grave, obtain a list of national and state veteran cemeteries, order a replacement headstone or learn about burial benefits. The searchable database, The Nationwide Gravesite Locator. includes burial records from numerous sources. Enter a name and your results will include which branch of the military the person served in, birth and death dates, where he or she is buried and contact information for the cemetery. Note, information on burials in private cemeteries prior to 1997 is not available. Finally, there is a link to search for American soldiers buried in foreign cemeteries.

www.cem.va.gov

 

 

 

Mystery Monday

Why do we read mysteries?  If you are reading this blog, it can be assumed that you like mysteries.  An interesting thread on Librarything discussed why people read mysteries, and there were some interesting theories.

1. We love to see people being punished for their evil deeds, and generally, mysteries accomplish this with the guilty being punished, or at least, arrested.

2. We love puzzles, figuring thngs out, and mysteries certainly contain puzzles.

3. Many mystery writers are superb at characterization, as well as plotting, and are just some of the best writers around.

4. In a long running series we become invested in our favorite characters like Stephanie Plum, Peter Decker and Alan Banks.

5. Mysteries explore the mind and actions of people who do terrible things and it satisfies our need to understand the human condition.

Do any of these reasons resonate with you?  Maybe you just like to settle in with any engrossing book and here are a few you mignt want to check out.

Monster in the Box by Ruth Rendell.  Inspector Wexford returns and we get some intriguing looks into his past.

BENEATH OUR FEET

We often look to speculative fiction to take us on journeys to distant galaxies, to transport us to far, fey kingdoms or realms of nightmare.  But there's a strange, lost land hiding much closer than we might suspect-- every day, in cities all around the world, humanity treads unthinkingly over it.  Those seemingly solid streets we drive on every day?  Hollow.  Buildings, sidewalks, even parks stretch over spacious caverns of air.  Although this sounds fantastical, I haven't even gotten to the "fiction" part yet-- read on! 

Syndicate content