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New Mysteries for November

Loot the Moon by Mark Arsenault

Jigsaw Guilt by Jeffrey Ashford

Death Message by Mark Billingham

Where's Billie? by Judith Yates Borger

For Better, For Murder by Lisa Bork

Tower by Ken Bruen

Tragic Magic by Laura Childs

Rude Awakening by Susan Cooper Rogers

Sink Trap by Christy Evans

All the Lonely People by Geraldine Evans

Murder She Wrote: A Fatal Feast by Jessica Fletcher

Trick or Treat by Kerry Greenwood

Ninth Daughter by Barbara Hamilton

Fingers of One Foot by Gerald Hammond

Stuff to Spy For by Don Bruns

Wyatt's Revenge by H. Terrell Griffin

Dead Reckoning by Claire Lorrimer

Cadger's Curse by Diane Gilbert Madsen

Monster in the Box by Ruth Rendell

Fool There Was by Betty Rowlands

Killer Crab Cakes by Livia J. Washburn

Shades of Grey by Clea Simon

In the Blood by Fay Sampson

Criminal Tendencies edited by Lynne Patrick

Drunkard's Path by Claire O'Donohue

Price of Malice by Archer Mayor

Chinese Whispers by Peter May

Huckleberry Finished by Livia J. Washburn

Darkest Room by Johan Theorin

Library Challenges

The library has met with several challenges lately that have hampered delivery of quality service.   On Saturday, October 25, during one of our more severe thunderstorms, the sump pump failed and staff were greeted the next morning with more than an inch of water in our lower level.  The only good news is that no materials were damaged. 

In a library environment it is critical that the water and moisture be addressed immediately.   The collection is the library’s most valuable asset.  Through having knowledgeable experienced staff, we were able to have a disaster recovery team onsite by Monday morning. 

Unfortunately, we needed to close the area, and the major part of the DVD collection, part of the non-fiction collection and our entire collection of science fiction, fantasy and horror are inaccessible.  It currently appears that the area will be opened up again on Monday or Tuesday.

What We Leave Behind

The circulation department checks in thousands of books every month.  One thing of which we are certain is finding something someone unintentionally left behind.  We returned lottery tickets (no winners), discarded used boarding passes and wondered if a recipe was a keeper.  Often we are able to return items to the rightful owner; money, bookmarks, bills, prescriptions or doctor's instructions.  If the item falls out of the book or there is nothing to identify the owner, it's added to our lost and found or the picture box on the circulation desk.  If only your pictures could talk we'd reunite Grandpa with his grandson, the graduate with prom pictures or the bridal party with the happy couple.  We keep pictures for a long time hoping someone will recognize a friend.  It has happened a few times, but it saddens us when pictures go unclaimed.  So check the pages before you return books, a picture is worth a thousand words but the ones you leave behind are silent. 

New Releases For Tuesday, October 27th

We have three new releases for Tuesday, October 27th.  They are:

Nothing Like the Holidays (Debra Messing)

Orphan (Horror Genre)

Whatever Works (Larry David - A Woody Allen Film)

 

Nonfiction Chronicles: Marathon Sunday

Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall

Think the New York City Marathon is a grueling test of endurance?  Well, to the Tarahumara Indians of the Copper Canyons of Mexico, it’s a walk in the park.  This reclusive tribe of super-runners can go hundreds of miles on desert terrain clad only in thin sandals after an all-night party drinking homemade tequila.   Author McDougall goes on a quest to discover the secrets to their peace-loving, cooperative, and very physical lifestyle by seeking out the mythical Caballo Blanco, an American ex-pat who earned their trust and serves as intermediary.  Using the Tarahumara as a backdrop, McDougall digresses into interesting topics such as the biomechanical superiority of barefoot running, reasons for the decline of U.S. distance running, and how evolutionary evidence points to the fact that the human body was, in fact, built for running.

Kids Yoga

There is still lots of room in Kids Yoga!

Saturdays, November 7, 14, 21

Grades 1-3 10am

Grades 4-5 11am

Call the children's desk today and reserve your spot.  Bring a mat or towel! 

Large Print: Cozy Up to a Good Mystery

October is a perfect month to read something spooky.  Do you like mysteries, but don’t like a lot of gore or violence? Cozy mysteries may be just right for you!  Jessica Fletcher, the heroine of the Murder, She Wrote series, leads off this list of recommendations, followed by other plucky woman detectives and even a cat!

A Little Yuletide Murder by Donald Bain
Santa’s been murdered! Actually, it’s farmer Rory Brent, who's played St. Nick at Cabot Cove's annual holiday event for years. Now Jessica has to track down the humbug that did it!

Audio Book Review: Eat, Pray, Love

Reviewed by Jodi Hink, Part Time Librarian

eat, pray, love

Summary:
Traces the author's decision to quit her job and travel the world for a year
after suffering a mid-life crisis and divorce, a journey that took her to
Italy, India and Indonesia.

Review:
Not only did this book give me a taste of all three countries, I enjoyed
seeing the author go through spiritual change. I usually do not think
authors reading their own books necessarily give the nuance a trained actor
would, but in this case since it was a memoir, I did enjoy hearing the author
read her book.

Book Review: Recipes for a Perfect Marriage

Reviewed by Jodi Hink, Part Time Librarian

Recipes for a Perfect Marriage

Author: Morag Prunty

Summary:
Tressa Nolan is a 38 year old food writer desperate to be married. When she does marry she is terrified she made the wrong choice in a mate. The story goes back and forth between Tressa's marriage and her Irish grandmother's seemingly perfect relationship with Tressa's grandfather. We soon discover all is not what it seems.

Review:

Audio Book Review: The Fountainhead

Reviewed by Jodi Hink, Part Time Librarian

The Foutainhead
Author: Ayn Rand

Summary:
Presents the story of a gifted architect, his struggle against conventional
standards, and his violent love affair.

Review:
The reader, Christopher Hurt, does an excellent job of reading this tale that
you will be happy it has 26 CDs. It is an exciting story that really delves
into human motivations.

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