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Nancy Moskowitz's blog

Mystery Monday

 

Mystery Monday is making a comeback after a very long absence.  The big news is the announcement of the 2016 Edgar awards.  Here is a list of the winners, followed by the nominees for each catagory.

Best Novel
Let Me Die in His Footsteps by Lori Roy
The Strangler Vine by M.J. Carter
The Lady From Zagreb by Phillip Kerr
Life or Death by Michael Robotham  

Best First Novel
The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen
Past Crimes by Glen Erik Hamilton
Where All Light Tends To Go by David Joy
Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll
Unbecoming by Rebecca Scherm

Best Paperback Original
The Long and Faraway Gone by Lou Berney
The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter
What She Knew by Gilly Macmillan
Woman With a Blue Pencil by Gordon McAlpine
Gun Street Girl by Adrian McKinty
The Daughter by Jane Shemilt

Grand Master
Walter Mosley

New Mysteries May 2016

Bloodroot by Cynthia Riggs
A Killer Ball at Honeychurch Hall by Hannah Dennison
The Strings of Murder by Oscar De Muriel
Cold Florida by Phillip Depoy
The Crow Girl by Erik Axl Sund
In the Cold, Dark Ground by Stuart MacBride
Mission Hill by Pamela Wechsler
After the Fire by Jane Casey
Diana's Altar by Barbara Cleverly
Murder in Morningside Heights by Victoria Thompson
Death at Breakfast by Beth Gutcheon
Drowned Detective by Neil Jordan
The Duration by Dave Fromm
Jigsaw Man by Elena Forbes
Linda as in the Linda Murder Leif G.W. Persson
The Service of the Dead by Candace Robb
Walleye Junction by Kain Salvalaggio
Blood Defense by Marcia Clark
That Darkness by Lisa Black
Tall Tail by Rita Mae Brown
Murder by George by Jeanne Quigley
Lost and Gone Forever by Alex Grecian

New Mysteries April 2016

Butcher Bird by S.D. Sykes

Calamity in Kent by John Rowland

The Bursar's Wife by E.G. Rodford

Big Fear by Andrew Case

Family Jewels by Stuart Woods

London Rain by Nicola Upson

Panther's Prey by Lachlan Smith

Delivering the Truth by Edith Maxwell

The Murder of Mary Russell by Laurie R. King

Here Comes the Bribe by Mary Daheim

The Bastards of Pizzofalcone by Maurizio De Giovanni

Murder on the Hour by Elizabeth J. Duncan

Blood Orange by Susan Wittig AlbertAs Time Goes By by Mary Higgins Clark

Death Along the River by Susanna Calkins

The Exiled by Christopher Charles

Dying for a Taste by Leslie Karst

Arab Jazz by Karim Miske

The Age of Treachery by Gavin Scott

Down the Darkest Street by Alex Segura

Better Than Google

If you come into the library anytime after school, or on week-ends, you will see tables crowded with tutors and their tutees.  Good money is spent on hiring tutors who help students with their academic subjects, SAT preparation and improving writing and reading skills. I feel this is a needless expense when there is a great database like Learning Express Library waiting for you.

New Mysteries March 2016

The Killing in the Cafe by Simon Brett
Time of Fog and Fire by Rhys Bowen
Bed of Scorpions by Judith Flanders
Lesser Evils by Joe Flanagan
The Case of the Missing Minor Dancer by Cathy Ace
Next of Kin by Maureen Carter
Speakers of the Dead by J.  Aaron Sanders
Stop the Presses by Robert Goldsborough   
Deadly Jewels by  Jeannette De Beauvoir
Waters of Eternal Youth by Donna Leon   
Off the Grid by C.J. Box   
Eleoquence of the Dead by Conor Brady
The Last Confession of Thomas Hawkins by Antonia Hodgson
Rain Dogs by Adrian McKinty
The Hourglass Factory by Lucy Ribchester
The Never0Open Desert Diner by James Anderson
The Midwife and the Assassin by Sam Thomas

Better Than Google

While perusing our list of databases,trying to get an idea for my blog, I came across one I was unfamiliar with, called EBSCO Explora.  This database is sponsored jointly by both RCLS and New York State.  In a word, it is amazing.  I tried a variety of different search terms, and the results were so google-like, that I had to remind myself I was not using Google.

New Mysteries February 2016

Blood Will Tell by Jeanne M. Dams
Murder at the Manor edited by Martin Edwards
Brotherhood in Death by J.D. Robb
Breakdown by Jonathan Kellerman
Into Oblivion by Arnaldur Indridason
Fine Art of Murder by Emily Barnes
Doll's House by m.J. Arlidge
Dearly Departed by Hy Conrad
A Voice From the Field by Neal Griffin
Shutter Man by Richard Montanari
Murder on a Summer's Day by Frances Brody
Blood Strand by Chris Ould
Apricot's Revenge by Ying, Song
Case of the Missing Morris Dancer by Cathy Ace
One Foot in the Grove by Lane, Kelly
Good Liar by Nicholas Searle
No Shred of Evidence by Charles Todd
Montalbano's First Case and Other Stories by Andrea Camilleri
Out of the Blues by Trudy Nan Boyce
I'm Traveling Alone by Samuel Bjork
Death of a Nurse by M.C. Beaton
Midsummer's Equation by Keigo Higashino
The Language of Secrets by Khan, Ausma Zehanat

Better Than Google

We have a new addition to our database collection and it comes courtesy of the Ramapo Catskill Library System.  It is called Glassdoor Jobs and Recruitment Site, and will be a boon to all those job seekers out there.  Due to its unusual content, you can search for a job title, but more than that, you can explore the corporate culture of an employer. Glassdoor holds a growing database of more than 8 million company reviewss, CEO approval ratings, salary reports, interview reviews and questions, benefits reviews, office photos and more. Unlike other jobs sites, all of this information is entirely shared by those who know a company best — the employees. Add to that millions of the latest jobs — no other site allows you to see which employers are hiring, what it's really like to work or interview there according to employees, and how much you could earn.

New Mysteries January 2015

The Readaholics and the Poirot Puzzle by Laura DiSilverio
Thread and Gone by Lea Wait
Murder Under the Bridge by Kate Raphael
Scandalous Behavior by Stuart Woods
The Shut Eye by Belinda Bauer
The Girls She Left Behind by Sarah Graves
The Herald of Hell by Paul Doherty
Presumed Puzzled by Parnell Hall
A Song for the Brokenhearted by William Shaw
Stillwater by Melissa Lenhardt
Kingdom Come by Jane Jensen
Guardian Stones by Eric Reed

Better Than Google

Professor of Library Science, Wayne Wiegand has just written a great new book entitled, Part of Our Lives: a people's history of the American public library.  While the appeal of this book is obvious to me, anyone with an interest in American social history, or in the state of public libraries would find this book fascinating.

Today, more than ever, we see prognosticators predicting the end of the public library.  By some measurements, this may have some credence. For example, reference transactions have declined markedly since 1999.  The days when a librarian armed with the World Almanac and a telephone book could answer any and all reference questions is certainly no longer true.  The Internet, and of course, Google, have pretty much obviated the need to call the library to settle a bet, or win a trivia contest.

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